What is Tularemia Rabbit Fever

A rabbit fever also known as tularemia, rabbit fever is a bacterial infection that is most often transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal, most commonly a rabbit or deer fly. This infection can also be contracted by inhaling bacteria-laden dust from infected animal carcasses or through contact with contaminated soil or water.

What is Tularemia

Symptoms of Rabbit Fever

Rabbit fever symptoms can range from mild to life-threatening and include fever, chills, headaches, muscle aches, joint pain, diarrhea, poor appetite, vomiting poor appetite, and vomiting if the bacteria enter the bloodstream. If you think you may have been exposed to the bacteria that causes tularemia, see your healthcare provider immediately or go to the emergency room.

Rabbit Fever Treatment

There is no specific vaccine available, but it is possible to prevent the virus from spreading by thoroughly cleaning any surface that may have come into contact with a rabbit, and by avoiding contact with wild rabbits. While there is no cure for rabbit fever, most people recover without any permanent damage.  If you think that you have the virus, see a doctor.

Tularemia is a serious disease and if left untreated can be fatal. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical. If you think you may have been exposed to the bacteria that causes tularemia, see your healthcare provider immediately or go to the emergency room.

Rabbit Fever Sources

Rabbits are the main source of tularemia in the United States, but the disease can be transmitted by many different animals, including deer, rodents, and birds. In most cases, tularemia is not passed from person to person. The incubation period for tularemia is usually three to five days but can range from one to 14 days. Symptoms of tularemia can include fever, chills, headaches, muscle aches, joint pain, diarrhea, poor appetite, and vomiting.

A Case Study by National Library of Medicine